Loading…
This event has ended. Create your own event → Check it out
This event has ended. Create your own
View analytic
Sunday, February 26 • 11:00am - 11:45am
SUNDANCE - [Oral Presentation] 2. Setting standards for a high-stakes Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE): Preliminary validity evidence

Sign up or log in to save this to your schedule and see who's attending!

11:15 AM - 11:30 AM

Clinicians’ Perspectives on the Challenges of Standard Setting for Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE)   
E.A. Hernandez, D. Kahn, E. Ha, R. Brook, C. Harris, M. Plesa, M. Lee, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA 
Abstract Body: Introduction: All eight California schools administer an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) at the end of the third year of medical school. Although the same cases are used, each school uses a different cut off for pass/fail. The David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA decided to use the modified Angoff method for setting criterion-based standards to determine the passing score of the exam for the graduating class of 2017. Research questions: What were some of the challenges encountered by clinician educators who participated in standard setting process for the OSCE? How were these challenges overcome? What could have been done differently? Would the clinician educators use this method for other tests in the future in other settings? Methods Six clinician educators were briefed by a Professor of Education on the modified Angoff method. The method was subsequently used to determine the passing score for an eight-station OSCE administered at the end of the third year of medical school. A survey with the above four questions were sent to the six clinician educators who participated in the standard setting. Results The most common challenges clinician educators encountered were 1) determining what a minimally competent third year medical student would know (4/6), 2) scheduling a time when all clinicians could meet (3/6), and 3) not allowing clinicians’ own experience to influence their decision (2/6). Challenges to the first problem were overcome by drawing on the experience of faculty who had more experience teaching medical students (3/4). 2 out of 6 respondents thought having videos of sample target students available prior to discussion could have been helpful. All six clinicians thought they could use this in other settings they teach though all acknowledged logistical issues that would make it difficult. Discussion The OSCE administered at the end of the third year is a perfect opportunity for the medical school to assess the clinical competency of their medical students. The modified Angoff method helps set a criterion-based standard that determines borderline performance. However, the main challenge encountered by the clinician educators in this study were defining what a minimally competent student would know or perform. A better definition of minimal competency may be achieved by more extensive review of student videos. Clinicians thought they might use this method for other tests in the future. 

Speakers

Sunday February 26, 2017 11:00am - 11:45am
SUNDANCE

Attendees (7)